23juillet2017

Cholera Platform

Against cholera

WHO Cholera country profile

Chad Cholera profil

Cholera Background History:

The first cases of cholera were reported in 1971 when the current pandemic hit the African continent, previously free of this scourge since the end of the nineteenth century.In 1971, following outbreaks in the north-eastern areas of Nigeria and Cameroon, Chad suffered a short but intense outbreak at the height of the hot, dry season, accounting for 8 230 cases and 2 411 deaths. (case fatality rate, CFR of 29.3%). In 1974, Chad reported 338 cases and 87 deaths, again with a high CFR of 25%. From 1975 until 1990 (during the internal conflict), no cholera case was reported. In 1991, Chad was hit by a large outbreak with 13 915 cases and 1344 deaths. Since then and until 2006, cholera was reported each year except in 1992, 1993, 1995, 2000 and 2002 and has thus become endemic.

Between 1996 and 2004, cases ranged between 4000 and 8800 per year with a CFR between 3.5% and 5.7%. Outbreaks tend to follow the same pattern originating in the Lake and Kanem regions, close to Lake Chad, then spreading towards Hadjer-Lamis and N'Djamena. Cross-border transmission often occur in the Lake Chad basin between Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria.

In 1971, following outbreaks in the north-eastern areas of Nigeria and Cameroon, Chad suffered a short but intense outbreak at the height of the hot, dry season, accounting for 8 230 cases and 2 411 deaths. (case fatality rate, CFR of 29.3%). In 1974, Chad reported 338 cases and 87 deaths, again with a high CFR of 25%.

From 1975 until 1990 (during the internal conflict), no cholera case was reported. In 1991, Chad was hit by a large outbreak with 13 915 cases and 1344 deaths.

Since then and until 2006, cholera was reported each year except in 1992, 1993, 1995, 2000 and 2002 and has thus become endemic. Between 1996 and 2004, cases ranged between 4000 and 8800 per year with a CFR between 3.5% and 5.7%. Outbreaks tend to follow the same pattern originating in the Lake and Kanem regions, close to Lake Chad, then spreading towards Hadjer-Lamis and N'Djamena. Cross-border transmission often occur in the Lake Chad basin between Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria.

2010-2011: Since July 2010, cholera cases started to be reported in the Lac and Mayo-Kebbi-Est regions bordering Nigeria, Niger and Cameroon where an epidemic is currently still ongoing. The government of Chad officially declared a cholera epidemic on 30 August 2010. The peak was reached during the first week of October before a progressive decrease in cases until the end of 2010.

In January 2011, the number of cases started to increase again and during September, 4 410 including 83 deaths were reported.